2017 Winter Institute - Call For Application

 

2017 EURO Winter Institute on “Methods and Models in Transportation Problems” 

University of Padova Winter-Summer Campus
Bressanone (Italy), 14-23 February 2017

Summary

EURO Summer and Winter Institutes (ESWI) are an instrument EURO has established for the encouragement of good scientific and social relationships between promising early stage OR scientists in Europe.

The EURO Winter Institute on “Methods and Models in Transportation Problems” will take place in Bressanone, Italy, from the 14th to the 23rd of February 2017. The event will be hosted by University of Padova and is organized by Euro Working Group on Transportation, under the patronage and sponsorship of the Association of European Operational Research Societies (EURO). It aims at gathering early stage researchers will establish a network of outstanding people who hopefully will continue to work together in the future.

The course will be composed by morning lectures and afternoon workshops and tutorials.

Applicants must have a single-authored or co-authored paper in the selected field, which has not yet been published, nor accepted for publication.

Joint cultural and outdoors activities are also planned.

To apply to the EWI have to submit their curriculum vitae, their paper together with a motivation statement to the Scientific Committee of the EWI.

The official language is English.

For detailed information visit the 2017 WI-EWGT page.

Overview on EURO EWI

EURO Winter Institutes (EWI) are an instrument EURO has established for the encouragement of good scientific and social relationships between promising early stage OR scientists in Europe. The main purpose of each EWI is to establish in each OR field a network of outstanding people who will continue to work together in the future.

Participation at an EWI can be considered as an honor, as it is limited to a restricted group of early stage researchers, who are either PhD students or who have less than two years research experience since completing a PhD.

To be eligible, a candidate must have a single-authored or co-authored paper in the field of Transportation and Logistics, which has not yet been published, nor accepted for publication.

To apply to the EWI, candidates from a EURO member society country, or studying in a EURO member society country, should submit their curriculum vitae, their paper together with a motivation statement to the Scientific Committee of the EWI. Additionally, up to two candidates can be appointed by IFORS, according to the EURO and IFORS exchange for ESWIs.

The Scientific Committee selects and ranks (in the case of more than one accepted from the same country) the candidates.

Every participant gives a well-prepared presentation of her/his paper as a starting point for discussion.

Invited experts' lectures will be included in the program, as well as tutorials and workshops conducted by the Scientific Committee.

WI-EWGT topics of interest

Main topics of interest are OR methods, mathematical models and computation algorithms to solve and support the solution of problems in the field of Transportation and Logistics.

Other related fields of main interest are:

  •  land-use and transportation planning

  • traffic control and simulation models

  • traffic network equilibrium models

  • public transport planning and management

  • applications of combinatorial optimization

  • vehicle routing and scheduling

  •  intelligent transportation systems

  • logistics and freight transportation

  • environment problems

  • evaluation methods.

WI Course Structure

The course will be composed by

   Morning lectures: 14 x 90 minutes: Monday to Friday 9:30 – 13:00

   Afternoon workshops and tutorials: Monday to Friday 14:00 – 17:30

Applicant requirements (IMPORTANT)

Who can apply?

-        PhD students at the final stage of their course (last one or two years)

-        Researchers who have less than two years research experience since completing a PhD

-        Candidates have to come from EURO member society country, or studying in a EURO member society country

-        Up to two candidates can be appointed by IFORS

What they have to submit…

1.     Curriculum Vitae including information about education, research projects, awards and other pertinent experiences (pdf format)

2.     A paper: applicants have to submit a single-authored or co-authored paper in the field of “Transportation and Logistics”, which has not yet been published, nor accepted for publication (pdf format)

3.     A motivation statement outlining your perspective and motivation to participate to the WI

How they have to submit…

The only official way to submit the application is the submission on-line form:

http://goo.gl/hh5edk

Selection Process

The selection will be done by the Scientific Committee and applicants will receive a notification by the 15th October 2016. Applicants might be asked to clarify their statement before the final decision. The admission process for candidates will focus on the quality of their scientific background as well as their interest in the fields of Transportation and Logistics. The Scientific Committee will notify the final decision by email and the selected applicants will then be announced in the official program and published on the Winter Institute’s web page.

Applications

Number of places: 20

Number of grants: 20

Financial support

Grants will cover room and board costs for students.

Important dates

Call for application launch: 20th August 2016

Deadline for applications: 30th September 2016 15th October 2016

Applicants notification: 15th October 2016 30th October 2016

Final program publication: 1st December 2016 15th January 2016.

Publication of contributions

The Organizing Committee has already received the approval from the EURO Journal on Transportation and Logistics for a special issue will collect a selection of the papers will be finalized during the EWI. The Scientific Committee will manage the Special Issue in order to publish the Issue not later than 6 months after the WI.

Social Program

Saturday and Sunday is for a joint cultural and outdoors activities. We plan a guided tour at one of the Bressanone area’s impressive cultural / historical sites and by sport activities as ski, sled or racket ski in the high-alpine area (Plose).

Scientific Committee

Jaume Barceló (Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain) (Chairman)

Mauro Dell’Orco (Technical University of Bari, Italy)

Giulio Erberto Cantarella (University of Salerno, Italy)

Jorge Freire de Sousa (University of Porto, Portugal)

Jorge Pinho de Sousa (University of Porto, Portugal)

Markos Papageorgiou (Technical University of Crete, Greece)

Riccardo Rossi (University of Padova, Italy)

Anna Sciomachen (University of Genova, Italy)

Walter Ukovich (University of Trieste, Italy)

Jacek Zak (Poznan Technical University, Poland)

Organizing Committee

Riccardo Rossi (University of Padova, Italy)

Massimiliano Gastaldi (University of Padova, Italy)

Yuval Hadas (Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, Israel) 

Venue

Youth House – University of Padova

via Rio Bianco 12

39042 Bressanone (Italy)

For information visit Municipality of Bressanone web site.

Info

 

Scheduled Lessons

Jaume Barceló
Department of Statistics and Operations Research, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya
UPC-Barcelona Tech
Barcelona, Spain

1.  Traffic Simulation: where we are, where we go?

Since the advent of digital computers systems simulation become one of the most powerful and widely used numerical techniques in the main fields of science and engineering applications and, logically, traffic and transportation systems could not be an exception. Since the formulation of the early traffic flow and car-following models, in the late 50’s of the past century traffic, simulation has significantly evolved. Traffic simulation, in any of its forms, is today extensively used in the analysis and design of traffic systems, traffic feasibility studies and many other applications, and perhaps one of the most relevant could currently be the use of traffic simulation to support real-time traffic management decisions. Since the early 70’s professional traffic simulation software has done a long way, and currently a variety of commercial and open source software is available, however, does this mean that all conventional traffic simulation challenges are solved?

 Just to mention a few examples: new automotive technologies (e.g. connected and autonomous vehicles) could require new approaches to core simulation models (e.g. car following and lane changing models for suitably emulate the new flow behavior); social changes (e.g. the shifting paradigm “from car-ownership to vehicle usage”) are prompting substantial changes in transport systems, asking for new modeling approaches; the ubiquitous presence of mobile sensors, capturing new traffic data in unprecedented amounts, allows new ways of defining better and more accurate model inputs, and also look in a different way to the most critical aspect of using simulation for decision making: the calibration and validation of simulation models. This lecture is aimed at providing a personal overview of the evolution of traffic simulation, a summary critical analysis of the current situation, highlighting some of the still not well solved problems and drawing the attention to some of the new modeling challenges.

2.  From Smart Cities to Wise Cities

In recent years the irruption, development and pervasive applications of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) has set the grounds to one of the deepest transformational changes that human societies have ever experienced. The need of understanding the implications of this challenge has raised a fundamental question: how ICT applications influence the urban development, the socioeconomic conditions and the quality of life, taking into account the critical role of cities as innovation engines. The primary response to this question has been the concept of Smart City, understanding it as a technological response to urban development problems. A key challenge in this process is the sustainability. It has been given for granted that a Smart City is by definition a sustainable city. But sustainability implies facing the threats and challenges to sustainability in a holistic way, by efficiently managing the critical infrastructures, transportation, communications, water and energy systems and at the same time provide efficient services to businesses and citizens.

However, the proposals of solutions for Smart Cities are predominantly dominated more by technology vendors than by initiatives of municipal authorities, critical voices claim that “smart city solutions must start with the city not the smart”, drawing the attention to the lack of integrated approaches driven more by cities’ problems than by technology solutions.

The balance is so far somewhat unclear, although some punctual progress has been achieved, however, looking, for example, at one of main “pillars” of a smart city, the “Smart Mobility”, and the proliferation of applications based on the most evolved ITC applications,  congestion and safety are still unsolved issues. Congestion is pervasively growing in the developed world, and even more in developing countries, and many people wonders why.

It is becoming progressively clearer that cities are complex dynamic systems, and therefore any city must be thought as a “System of Systems”, each of its components being a complex subsystem of the complex system, and Mobility, the one that focus our interest, is only one of the components of such complex system, strongly interacting with all other components and therefore its implications must be analyzed in the context of these interactions. From a methodological point of view that means that the understanding of the city as a complex system requires a suitable ad hoc modeling approach to deal with it. This modeling approach can be a suitable combination Urban Dynamics specifically designed to account for cities’ complexity in terms of the multiple variables, feedback loops between components, and the role of the influencing factors ( e.g. social and technological paradigm shifts) with Dynamic Transport Models. This methodological approach   is propitiating a change in the perspective, moving from the concept of “Smart City” (A market driven concept) to “Wise Cities” (A Citizen driven concept), understanding that WISE comes from: W (Wellness and Walkable); I   (Intelligence  & ICT);  S  (Sustainable & Safety) ; E  (Ecology, Energy & Economy). That is move from a market centered perspective (Smart Cities) to a perspective   taking humans back to the center of the microcosms: the city.

The lecture is aimed to share with the audience a reflection on the role of transport modeling in this context.

 

Mauro Dell’Orco
D.I.C.A.T.E.Ch. - Technical University of Bari
Bari, Italy

1.    Introduction to the Fuzzy Sets

In the classic theory of sets, it is quite easy to determine whether an element belongs to a set or not. Thus, the value of the membership function μA(x) belongs to the set {0, 1}. However, in reality many sets do not have precisely defined bounds, so that is difficult to separate the elements in the set from those outside the set. For example, how could we define the set of numbers “close to 5”? Alternatively, how much is true the statement “10 is close to 5”? A fuzzy set A is defined as the set of ordered pairs A = {x, μA(x)}, where μA(x) is the grade of membership of element x in set A. Differently from classic sets, for fuzzy sets the membership function μA(x) can take any value from the closed interval [0,1]. The greater μA(x), the greater the truth of the statement that element x belongs to set A. Natural languages used in interpersonal communication are characterized by uncertainty, ambiguity, and imprecision. Nevertheless, we usually have no difficulty in understanding each other. On the contrary, in some situations, absolute precision may even cause confusion. At the driving school, the instruction “when approaching an intersection, reduce the speed” is more easily understood than the following type of instruction: “at a distance of 45.24 m from an intersection, slow down to 36.7 km/h”. Fuzzy stets can more conveniently describe linguistic variables or situations, either exceptionally complex or insufficiently defined. In order to explain these concepts or situations, we will deal with definition and arithmetic of fuzzy sets and the fuzzy relations. In particular, we will introduce and apply the extension principle.  

2.    Introduction of the Fuzzy Set Theory to Transportation Problems 

  • A parking choice model
  • Route-choice problems in urban network
  • Vehicle routing problem with uncertain demand 
 
Giulio E. Cantarella
Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno
Fisciano Campus, Salerno, Italy

1.    User equilibrium in transportation networks: fixed-point models

Transportation supply models, derived from the flow network theory: the graph and the arc cost function; travel demand models, derived from the random utility theory: route choice models; demand assignment to an uncongested network: the arc flow function; demand assignment to a congested network: fixed-point models for equilibrium, existence and uniqueness conditions, MSA algorithms and convergence conditions.

2.    Day-to-day dynamics in transportation networks: deterministic process models

Learning and memory models; habit and inertia models;  deterministic process models, derived from the markov discrete-time non-linear dynamic systems theory: attractors, dissipative systems, local stability, global stability, bifurcations; general deterministic process models for day-to-day dynamic assignment; simple deterministic process models for day-to-day dynamic assignment.

 
Jorge Pinho de Sousa
Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, University of Porto,
Porto, Portugal

Trends and challenges in Urban Mobility – data, decision support and operations management

The lectures will briefly describe some research and development projects for the design and management of mobility systems, emphasizing the importance of information systems for travelers, for transport operators and for policy makers. We will discuss some research opportunities of a multidisciplinary nature that involve a growing integration of qualitative approaches with the traditional models of Operational Research, or increasingly sophisticated information and communication systems. References will also be made to applications in urban mobility (public passenger transport, urban logistics) or to the increasing use of public information (open-data) with the co-creation of knowledge for a more efficient and sustainable use of transport systems. A part of these research activities has been developed in the context of the Doctoral Program in Transportation Systems, University of Porto, in collaboration with researchers at MIT.

 

Yuval Hadas
Department of Management, Bar-Ilan University
Ramat Gan, Israel

1.    Public transport spatiotemporal analysis: models, data, and techniques

Public Transport (PT) systems are complex systems with spatial and temporal attributes. Stops, stations, routes are examples of the former, while frequencies, time-tables are examples of the later. Thus, in order to analyze PT systems, it is essential to develop models that integrate those aspects. Several data sources can be used for the analysis: Automatic Data Collection systems (ADC) such as AVL, APC, AFC; static data (GTFS); and real-time (GTFS-realtime, SIRI). The students will be introduced to PT systems, connectivity models, data sources structures, and techniques as a tool box for PT analysis.

2.    Transportation networks evacuation: design, planning, and operations

Natural and man-created disasters, such as hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis, accidents and terrorist attacks, have shown the need for quick evacuation. Evacuation routes are mostly based on the capacities of the road network. However, in extreme cases such as earthquakes, road network infrastructure may adversely be affected, and may not supply the required capacities. As a result, it is important to develop models that can integrate the demand, supply, risks, effects, and policy making for the assessment of the network, optimize preparedness, and evacuation time. The students will be introduced to network flow models, evacuation performance measures, and techniques.

 
Markos Papageorgiou
Department of Production Engineering and Management, Technical University of Crete
Chania, Greece

1.    Freeway Traffic Control

Daily traffic congestion on freeway networks around the world continues to increase, with detrimental effects on travel times, traffic safety, fuel consumption and environmental pollution. Traffic control measures, if properly designed and deployed, may lead to substantial savings of travel time, fuel consumption and environmental impact, along with an improvement of traffic safety. The presentation outlines the related traffic control problems and methods, with a focus on optimal control and feedback approaches. More specifically, the areas of macroscopic traffic flow modelling, local and coordinated ramp metering, variable speed limit control, mainstream traffic flow control, bottleneck traffic control and route information and guidance are addressed, along with the presentation of some selected field results.

2.    Traffic Management in the Era of Vehicle Automation and Communication Systems (VACS)

A significant and growing interdisciplinary effort by the automotive industry, as well as by numerous research institutions, has been devoted in the last decades to planning, development, testing and deployment of a variety of Vehicle Automation and Communication Systems (VACS) that are expected to revolutionise the features and capabilities of individual vehicles within the next decades. If exploited appropriately, the emerging VACS may enable sensible novel traffic management actions aiming at mitigating traffic congestion and its detrimental implications. The presentation reviews the expected changes in the years to come. Potential implications and preliminary results for future traffic management are presented.

 
Anna Sciomachen
Department of Economics and Business Studies, University of Genova
Genova, Italy

1.    Facilities location in freight logistic network. Impact of externality costs

A facility location problem in a freight logistics context is faced. The focus is the containerized flow from maritime terminals via road and rail; key elements are the location of logistics parks in terms of effectiveness of the logistics corridors and the evaluation of externalities on decisions concerning the port system with inland ports. The problem is modelled on a capacitated weighted multimodal network. A MILP model is presented for minimizing both the location and shipping costs, taking into account congestion, air pollution, incidentally and noise components. Results of real size instances, related to the Ligurian port network are presented. 

2.    Fleet planning decisions in distribution networks within a Smart City framework

Mobility is a crucial aspect of urban living and is a core component of a smart city. We face a variant of the VRP tailored for including environmental issues and street limitations, motivated by the requirements for sustainable urban transport. The empirical research concerns a fleet planning problem. A MILP model is proposed and validated using data of a B2C grocery company in the metropolitan area of Genoa smart city. Results show that distribution strategies reach better business and environmental performances, if the smart mobility goals are included into the distribution model from the beginning.

 
Walter Ukovich
Department of Engineering and Architecture, University of Trieste
Trieste, Italy

1.    Cooperative logistics  - H2020 projects - part 1

The approach of H2020 projects for cooperative logistics is presented, with special attention to the CO-GISTICS (2014-2017) and AEOLIX (2016 2019) projects.

2.     Cooperative logistics  - H2020 projects - part 2

The services implemented in the Trieste test site of the CO-GISTICS project are presented.

 
Jacek Zak 
Department of Engineering and Architecture, Poznan University of Technology
Poznan, Poland

1.    Multiple Criteria Decision Making/ Aiding in Transportation

2.     Mathematical Modeling of Transportation Processes and Systems. State of the Art.

 

 

Programme

 

Day 1

Day 2

Day 3

Day 4

Day 5

14/02

15/02

16/02

17/02

18/02

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

 

9:00-10:30

LESSON

JaumeBarcelò

9:00-10:30

LESSON

Walter Ukovich

9:00-10:30

LESSON

GiulioErbertoCantarella

Social event: let's go skiing/walking/sledding!

10:30-11:00

Break

10:30-11:00

Break

10:30-11:00

Break

11:00-12:30

LESSON

Yuval Hadas

11:00-12:30

LESSON

MarkosPapageorgiou

11:00-12:30

LESSON

MarkosPapageorgiou

12:30-14:00

Lunch

13:00-14:30

Lunch

13:00-14:30

Lunch

Lunch

14:30-16:00

LESSON

Walter Ukovich

14:30-16:00

LESSON

GiulioErbertoCantarella

14:30-18:00

WORKSHOP

Free tour of Brixen

15:00-19:00

Registration*

16:00-16:15

Break

16:00-16:15

Break

19:00

Welcome Party - Dinner

16:15-18:00

WORKSHOP

16:15-18:00

WORKSHOP

19:00

Dinner

19:00

Dinner

19:00

Dinner

19:00

Pizza

 

 

 

Day 6

Day 7

Day 8

Day 9

Day 10

19/02

20/02

21/02

22/02

23/02

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Cultural visit

9:00-10:30

LESSON

Yuval Hadas

9:00-10:30

LESSON

Jorge Pinhode Sousa

9:00-10:30

WORKSHOP 

9:00-10:30

LESSON

Anna Sciomachen

10:30-11:00

Break

10:30-11:00

Break

10:30-11:00

Break

10:30-11:00

Break

11:00-12:30

LESSON

Jacek Zak

11:00-12:30

LESSON

Jacek Zak

11:00-12:30

LESSON

Mauro Dell’Orco

11:00-12:30

LESSON

JaumeBarcelò

13:00-14:30

Lunch

13:00-14:30

Lunch

13:00-14:30

Lunch

13:00-14:30

Lunch

13:00

Farewell Party

14:30-18:00

WORKSHOP

14:30-16:00

LESSON

Jorge Pinhode Sousa

14:30-16:00

LESSON

Mauro Dell’Orco

14:30-16:00

WORKSHOP

Anna Sciomachen

16:00-16:15

Break

16:00-16:15

Break

16:00-16:15

Break

16:15-18:00

WORKSHOP

16:15-18:00

WORKSHOP

 

16:15-18:00

WORKSHOP

19:00

Dinner

19:00

Dinner

19:00

Dinner

19:00

Dinner

 

Registrations will be manage at the Residence at the following address (1km far from the Railway Station):


Piazza seminario 2 
I-39042 Bressanone
South Tyrol (BZ)
Tel. 0472 832 204

 

 

Patrons

 

The Association of European Operational Research Societies

EURO Working Group on Transportation 

   Italian Society of Operational Research

Italian Society of Transportation Academics

University of Padova- Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Municipality of Bressanone

Galilean School of Higher Education

 

 

 

 

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